JJA Awards for Journalism and Media Announced

A long list of talented jazz journalists picked up Jazz Journalists Association (JJA) Awards in ceremonies held today at the Blue Note in NYC.

I couldn’t get there, but, hey, I was there in spirit!

“Professional Journalist Members of the JJA made open nominations in a first selection round; those who received the most nominations advanced to the final ballot,” as outlined by the JJA (I’m a member).

Kudos to the following:

+ Lifetime achievement in jazz journalism: Ted Panken

+ Jazz periodical: DownBeat

+ Jazz blog: Ethan Iverson‘s “Do the Math”

+ Jazz book: “Billie Holiday: The Musician and the Myth,” by John Szwed

+ Robert Palmer-Helen Oakley Dance Award for Excellence in Writing in 2015: Nate Chinen

+ Willis Conover-Marian McPartland Award for Broadcasting in 2015: Linda Yohn, WEMU

+ Lona Foote-Bob Parent Award for Photography in 2015: Ken Franckling

+ Jazz Photo of the Year: Patrick Marek

+ Jazz Album Art of the Year: Mike Park, for Kamasi Washington, “The Epic”

For more details, visit the JJA online

Maria Schneider Grabs Lion’s Share of Top JJA Awards

41º VOLL-DAMM FESTIVAL INTERNACIONAL JAZZ BARCELONA

Big band leader Maria Schneider, fast-rising saxophonist Kamasi Washington and composer Henry Threadgill have picked up major honors in the 2016 JJA Jazz Awards for Musical Achievement.

Schneider won in the categories of musician, composer, and arranger, while her New York-based Maria Schneider Orchestra won album of the year for “The Thompson Fields,” and large ensemble of the year. L.A. tenor man Washington won for up and coming artist, and Chicago saxophonist/flutist Threadgill received the Lifetime Achievement in Jazz award, on the heels of winning a Pulitzer and being named a Doris Duke Performing Artist.

Also receiving JJA honors — to be awarded at artists’ respective performances around the United States this summer — are:

Midsize Ensemble — Myra Melford’s Snowy Egret

Trio or Duo — Vijay Iyer Trio

Trumpeter — Wadada Leo Smith

Trombonist — Wycliffe Gordon

Multi-reeds Player — Anat Cohen

Alto Saxophonist — Rudresh Mahanthappa

Tenor saxophonist — Charles Lloyd

Baritone saxophonist — Gary Smulyan

Soprano saxophonist — Jane Ira Bloom

Flutist — Nicole Mitchell

Clarinetist — Anat Cohen

Guitarist — Mary Halvorson

Pianist – Fred Hersch

Keyboardist — Craig Taborn

Bassist — Christian McBride

Violinist/Violist/Cellist – Regina Carter

Percussionist — Pedrito Martinez

Mallets instrumentalist — Joe Locke

Traps Drummer — Jack DeJohnette

Player of Instruments Rare in Jazz — Scott Robinson

Electronics Player — Jason Lindner

Male singer — Gregory Porter

Female singer — Cecile McLorin Salvant

The JJA also honors jazz journalists, of course. Winners of jazz awards for media will be announced in ceremonies at a public, ticketed gathering on June 15 at the Blue Note in New York City .

For more info on the JJA, visit http://news.jazzjournalists.org/ or contact president@jazzjournalists.org

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy JazzApril — Celebrate Jazz Appreciation Month

herbie hancock

Jazz is alive and, well, in surprisingly good shape for its age, particularly given the ravages of time, the advent of more widely embraced musical forms, popular misconceptions about jazz, and some weird biases against the music (see: last year’s jazz-mocking “satire” pieces).

Not to mention the simultaneous rise of “free” music online and the loss of profits — or disappearance altogether — of many formerly robust label homes for jazz artists.

Jazz Appreciation Month, or JazzApril as it’s called by the Jazz Journalists Association (I’m a member), is a great reminder of the legacy, influence and continuing vitality of jazz, in all its diverse forms, at home in the United States and abroad.

Jazz Appreciation Month was created in 2012 by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History to “herald and celebrate the extraordinary heritage and history of jazz. (And) …to stimulate the current jazz scene and encourage people of all ages to participate in jazz – to study the music, attend concerts, listen to jazz on radio and recordings, read books about jazz, and support institutional jazz programs.”

This year, JAM culminates April 30 with International Jazz Day, to be officially celebrated in Paris with a concert featuring a long list of world-class jazzers, including pianist Herbie Hancock, singers Dee Dee Bridgewater, Dianne Reeves, and Al Jarreau; saxophonist Wayne Shorter; bassists James Genus, Marcus Miller, and Ben Williams; guitarist Lee Ritenour; drummer Terri Lyne Carrington; percussionist Mino Cinelu; and harmonica player Gregoire Maret.

The concert will be streamed live at JazzDay.com.

(The JJA in 2012 created JazzApril as a vehicle for promoting both JAM and IJD).

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How best to celebrate jazz in April, or year round? The JJA has some recommendations here.

I have some similar suggestions:

1)BUY jazz recordings, directly from the artist, if possible, or through many of the online forums for ordering downloads or physical copies (CDs, vinyl) of jazz artists’ work. Many, many independent jazz artists also sell their work through CD Baby.

2)Maybe just as important, or more essential … Attend performances by jazz artists, whether nationally known folks traveling through your town, or locally based performers. Support shows by jazz artists at every venue they play, including traditional theaters and nightclubs, restaurants, art galleries, college campuses and everywhere else. Let venue owners know that you like jazz and will gladly return to their venues to see jazz shows. While you’re at the jazz-supporting venues, spend money on food and drinks. Make venue owners WANT to book jazz artists.

3)Support your local jazz festival with your attendance, your donations, your spending while at the festival, and your patronage of the fest’s sponsors. Unhappy about the quotient of actual jazz to other music at any given “jazz” festival? Share your concerns, or start your own fest.

4)Support your local jazz radio station with your listening, your calls, your emails, and your donations. In the Tampa Bay area, WUSF, 89.7 FM is the place to visit for great jazz).

5)Encourage your city, county, and state to devote some of its funding of arts events to jazz performances and events.

6)Support jazz education in the public schools and in colleges. Attend student performances, and make donations to those programs.

7)Subscribe to jazz magazines — like JazzTimes, DownBeat, and Jazziz — and other publications that regularly cover jazz.

8)Visit those publications’ web sites, and other sites and blogs that focus on jazz, like All About Jazz, E Jazz News, NPR’s a blog supreme, Doug Ramsey’s Rifftides, Marc Myers’ JazzWax, and Howard Mandel’s Jazz Beyond Jazz.

9)Buy jazz-related books. Among recent critics’ favorites: Terry Teachout‘s “Duke: A Life of Duke Ellington,” Stanley Crouch’s “Kansas City Lightning: The Rise and Times of Charlie Parker,” Gary Burton & Neil Tesser’s “Learning to Listen: The Jazz Journey of Gary Burton.”

10)Appreciate a jazz critic. Why not?

JJA Jazz Awards 2014

(Apologies for the late posting of this …)

Wayne Shorter, Maria Schneider and Joe Lovano were among the major winners in this year’s JJA Jazz Awards, and Herbie Hancock was honored for Lifetime Achievement in Jazz.

Shorter and/or his quartet won in the categories of musician, record (“Without a Net”), and midsize ensemble; while Schneider and/or her orchestra were honored as composer, arranger, and large ensemble. Lovano was named the year’s top tenor saxophonist and multi-reeds player.

The JJA Awards, first presented in 1997, are selected by the voting members of the Jazz Journalists Association, a group that includes professional journalists, industry associates, and supporters.

For the full list of awards, honoring excellence in jazz music, recordings, presentation, and jazz journalism/media, click here.

 

 

PLANET JAZZ: Irvin Mayfield, Last Night on “Treme”; Inside-Jazz Story to Read Before You Die; JJA’s Jazz Blogging Webinars

Planet Jazz: Notes From All Over

Nice seeing New Orleans trumpeter Irvin Mayfield get some speaking lines on last night’s “Treme.” Great, too, seeing some Mayfield performance footage shot at his Jazz Playhouse club inside the Royal Sonesta Hotel on Bourbon Street.

Lionel Ferbos, the century-old trad jazz trumpeter, was also seen and heard playing and talking, at the long-running Palm Court Jazz Cafe, in the episode. Ferbos, one of the oldest living links to early jazz, started playing at age 15, in 1926.

“Lionel Ferbos is 101 and he’s playing gigs. He’s walking up on stage, getting his trumpet out and playing,” Mayfield told the Times-Picayune. “He comes out of the water of Jelly Roll Morton, who he heard himself, Louis Armstrong, who he heard himself, Freddie Keppard, who he heard himself. Paul Barbarin, Danny Barker – these are people he heard. In his trumpet sound, you hear all that.”

The episode touches on the much-publicized drive to create a National Jazz Center in New Orleans. The developers of the $716 million project, announced in May 2006, enlisted Mayfield’s support. The project subsequently collapsed.

“Though the National Jazz Center and other subsequent efforts to establish some kind of civic institution to recognize New Orleans’ greatest export have fallen short, Mayfield is confident that such a project will some day get done,” Dave Walker wrote in the Times-Picayune.

” ‘It is just crazy that we have so much history but we don’t have symbols recognizing all that creative achievement,’ he said. ‘We’ve created this music that everybody else around the world is in awe of.’

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Remember “Ten Jazz Albums to Hear Before You Die,” a feature (initially published sans byline) published last week in the Village Voice?

Several jazz writers justifiably complained about the piece’s incompleteness, as it covered just 17 years of jazz history (1956-73) and its, uh, obviousness; we really needed another litany of the jazz canon? It didn’t seem to meet the usual, or, at least, former, high standards for a publication that once set a high standard for jazz coverage.

As a sort of (unstated) concession to the criticism, the next day the Voice published another piece, “Ten (More) Jazz Albums to Hear Before You Die,” by Matthew Kassel and Alex W. Rodriguez. This time, the (different) writers offered recommendations culled from about a century of jazz history.

Writing for NPR’s “A Jazz Supreme” blog, Patrick Jarenwattanon filled in some background on how the original ill–fated story came to be:

“The piece itself was simply repurposed from another publication owned by the same media company, and its author wasn’t even credited (it’s a fellow named Joseph Lapin, by the way). It was published by a media entity that used to run Gary Giddins’ column, and Francis Davis essays, and the Jazz Consumers Guide, and the year-end critics poll, and much other current jazz coverage. Underlying all this is the fact that two well-respected music editors, Rob Harvilla and Maura Johnston, have left the Voice in recent years.”

For those outside the jazzosphere, maybe this is all too meta?

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The Jazz Journalists Association continued its webinar series on the art of jazz blogging with a Nov. 13 program featuring Angelika Beener, Veronica Grandison, Alex Rodriguez, and Jonathan Wertheim.

The latest installment, focused on “up-and-coming” jazz bloggers, is archived on YouTube, here.  On the way are two more blogging webinars, slated for Nov. 20 and Dec. 4. Register

JJA members soon will unveil their Top 10 picks for 2012, surveying the year’s best jazz — look for the lists at the organization’s site.

Straight Ahead: 16th Annual JJA Awards; UF jazz prof/trumpeter Gary Langford honored; Herb Snitzer a photography nominee

Jazz musicians and the music’s movers and shakers will be honored in 40 categories at the 16th annual Jazz Journalists Association (JJA) Jazz Awards, slated for June 20 at the Blue Note in NYC.

Pianists Horace Silver (left) and Muhal Richard Abrams, bassist Ron Carter and saxophonist Wayne Shorter are up for Lifetime Achievement in Jazz awards.

Saxophonists Sonny Rollins, Lee Konitz, Phil Woods and Joe Lovano, pianist Keith Jarrett, guitarists John Scofield, Pat Metheny and Bill Frisell,  drummer Paul Motian, vibraphonist Gary Burton, and singers Kurt Elling, Freddy Cole, Tierney Sutton and Karrin Allyson are among the other veteran musicians nominated for awards, as well as rising-star talents including bassist Esperanza Spalding,  trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire, pianists Vijay Iyer and Craig Taborn, tenor saxophonist J.D. Allen, guitarist Mary Halvorson, vibist Warren Wolf and drummer Eric Harland.

(A Tampa Bay area note: The gifted St. Petersburg-based photographer Herb Snitzer, whose work was featured at the Tampa Museum of Art in recent months, is up for the Lona Foote-Bob Parent Award for Photography)

Organ Monk, a quartet led by Greg Lewis, will play the event, along with two duos: singer Paulette McWilliams and pianist Nat Adderley, Jr., and guitarist Gabriel Marin and bassist John Ferrara.

The ceremonies will also honor esteemed jazz writer Albert Murray with the “Music and Words” award, co-sponsored by the JJA and the Jazz Foundation of America.

A number of Jazz Heroes–  “activists, advocates, altruists, aiders and abettors of jazz” — will be honored at a series of affiliated JJA Jazz Awards satellite parties in Atlanta, Boston, Chicago, Detroit, Los Angeles, Philadelphia, San Francisco, Schenectady, and Tucson, as well as locations in Ca nada and New Zealand.

Two of those parties will be held in Florida — June 20 at B-Sharp’s Jazz Club, and June 21 at Leonardo’s 706 in Gainesville. I’m happy to say that the jazz hero being honored in Gainesville is my former jazz band director at the University of Florida, the gifted trumpeter and very influential educator Gary Langford. The Marty Liquori Jazztet will play that event.

Here’s the official citation for the award, as written by JJA member Dustin Garlitz:

“R. Gary Langford is Professor of Music Emeritus at the University of Florida in Gainesville, who as UF’s Director of Jazz Studies from 1981-2006 regularly taught a popular jazz history course that introduced thousands of undergraduates to the music. A trumpeter who, during his graduate studies at North Texas State University was a soloist with the One O’Clock (Jazz) Lab Band, he’s also an accomplished arranger and composer.

Gary held offices in the International Association of Jazz Educators, Florida Unit (President from 1984-1986), and was honored by IAJE in 1982-1983 as its Outstanding Jazz Educator.  He has been the recipient of many other honors: Teacher of the Year from UF’s College of Fine Arts, a TIP award for excellence in teaching, twice a finalist for the prestigious UF Alumni Association Distinguished Professor Award, the Foundation For The Promotion of Music’s 1997 Musician of the Year and the 1998 College Music Educator of the Year for the state of Florida (conferred by the Florida Music Educators Association).  In 1999 he was awarded the prestigious “Distinguished Service to Music Medal” by Kappa Kappa Psi, the national band fraternity and he was named most co-UF Teacher of the Year for 2006-2007.

He has directed numerous county, district and all-state bands, including the Alachua County Youth Orchestra; he’s been music director and conductor for more than 25 years.  He’s a Gainesville Jazz Hero deserving wider recognition, and thanks to the JJA is getting some.”

More info on the Gainesville event is here.

The NYC Jazz Awards gala is a fundraiser for the 24-year-old JJA, which numbers jazz writers, broadcasters, photographers, new media producers and other supporters of jazz journalism among its membership (I’m a longstanding voting member).

For more info on the JJA, visit the organization’s site – Jazz House. Complete details on the JJA Jazz Awards 2012 is available here.

JJA Awards: Web Site Launched, Nominations On the Way

Nearly 60 jazz critics* made nominations for this year’s Jazz Journalists Association Awards, honoring achievements in jazz and jazz journalism from March 2009 to this month.

Nominations are being tabulated as we speak, and will be announced soon. The awards will be announced on April 15, and the JJA Awards Gala will be held this June in New York.

For all things JJA Awards, including Gary Giddins‘ piece on the importance of the awards, and Neil Tesser‘s item on how the JJA’s awards differ from other groups’ awards, please visit the official awards site.

On Facebook? You can become a “fan” of the JJA 2010 Jazz Awards by visiting http://tinyurl.com/y85gg9k

*(including me)