Note to readers: Thanks, and follow me!

Thanks to all who follow my blog, as well as to those who visit only occasionally.

Jazzlands is purely a labor of love, a way to kind of document my comings and goings in the music and jazz world, and to share my magazine work with a larger audience.

If you like what you read, please follow my blog, and I’d also invite you to follow me on Twitter at @pboothmusic.

You may know that in addition to writing about jazz and other music, I actively play with several bands around Florida, including: Acme Jazz Garage (also on Facebook; and @acmejazzgarage on Twitter ), Swan City Jazz Project (on Facebook), Trio Vibe, and Zensemble. I occasionally play with blues band the Juke Joint Kings, and the Blue Guava Orchestra (on Facebook), and once or twice a year I sub with the Tomkats Jazz Orchestra.

Also, I have a Facebook page offering info on my all of my various music-playing activities — Philip Booth Music.

So … stop by one of the above online locations if and when you can, and please follow me.

If you’re in Tampa on a Thursday or Friday night, you can catch me with Acme Jazz Garage at Timpano, 1610 W. Swann Ave. in Hyde Park Village. We start at 7 pm both nights (until 10 on Thursdays; until 11 on Fridays).

Lately, I’ve been doing more gigs with Swan City Jazz Project, with my Lakeland pals Jody Marsh (fellow LHS classmate) on piano, and Rick Runion on sax; sometimes we’re joined by a drummer to make it a quartet.

Ahead for Swan City:

I’d love to bring one of my bands to your festival, special event or nightclub. We’re actively looking for paying gigs. And I’m always looking for a way to a label home for my next CD project. The Acme Jazz Garage CD, released in 2016, was played on 35 or so radio stations across the country, and was reviewed in Relix and other national and local publications.

So if you have any ideas on gigs or on helping me fund a recording of original music, hit me up at jphilipboothAThotmailDOTcom

Meanwhile, back to your usual programming.

 

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Jazz in NYC: Tom Harrell at the Village Vanguard (review)

While in NYC recently, I had the pleasure of checking out a few great jazz shows.

Glad I got the chance to hear the great trumpeter and flugelhorn player Tom Harrell‘s quintet at the Vanguard, bassist Santi Debriano‘s quartet at Smalls, and vibraphonist Jason Marsalis‘s group at the Jazz Standard (more about these later).

Harrell at the Vanguard

On Harrell, I wrote: “It was the most sonically stripped-down moment, and perhaps the most dramatic: About midway through his first set on a recent Thursday night at New York’s venerable Village Vanguard, three of Tom Harrell’s bandmates slipped off stage, leaving the veteran brass player and prolific composer alone except for bassist Ugonna Okegwo, who stood at the rear of the small stage.”

Read the rest of the review, for Relix/Jambands.com, here

Grammys to Jazz: No Prime Time for You!

Despite my best intentions, I tuned in tonight to the Grammys, the music industry’s annual orgy of self-love, er, popularity contest.

Jazz and blues artists and awards were all but banned from the broadcast portion of this year’s awards.

Unless it happened when I momentarily left the room, there were no on-air mentions of Grammys in those categories. And the only musicians onstage representing those genres were pianist and New Orleans native Jon Batiste (of “The Late Show”) and Austin guitar slinger Gary Clark Jr., who, accompanied by a drummer, joined forces for a quick salute to two recent fallen icons — Fats Domino and Chuck Berry.

So … let’s honor them here:

  • Best Improvised Jazz Solo: “Miles Beyond” — John McLaughlin, soloist
  • Best Jazz Vocal Album: “Dreams and Daggers” — Cécile McLorin Salvant
  • Best Jazz Instrumental Album: “Rebirth” — Billy Childs
  • Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album: “Bringin’ It” — Christian McBride Big Band
  • Best Latin Jazz Album: “Jazz Tango” — Pablo Ziegler Trio
  • Best Instrumental Composition: “Three Revolutions” — Arturo O’Farrill, composer (Arturo O’Farrill and Chucho Valdés)
  • Best Contemporary Instrumental Album: “Prototype” — Jeff Lorber Fusion

And jazz people won in a couple other categories:

  • Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album: “Tony Bennett Celebrates 90” — Various Artists; Dae Bennett, producer
  • Best Surround Sound Album: “Early Americans” — Jane Bunnett                                   

Loved hearing Chris Stapleton and Emmylou Harris pay tribute to the late Tom Petty with an acoustic performance of his “Wildflowers.”

Glad, too, to see Grammys go to:

  • Best American Roots Song: “If We Were Vampires” — Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit
  • Best Americana Album: “The Nashville Sound” — Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit
  • Best Contemporary Blues Album: “TajMo” — Taj Mahal and Keb’ Mo’

“Most of the (jazz and blues) awards were distributed during the Grammy Premiere Ceremony, which streamed live at grammy.com., ” as Nate Chinen points out in his column for WBGO.org. “One clear highlight of that ceremony was a performance by Jazzmeia Horn, who was in the running for Best Jazz Vocal Album for her self-assured debut, A Social Call.”

So, gee, thanks, National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences, for all but entirely squeezing jazz and blues musicians out of your broadcast, in favor of a variety of assorted musical nonsense. How’d ‘ya like U2’s lip-syncing?

**********

In other news, Tampa’s own Chuck Owen, a pianist, composer, and longtime USF jazz prof, and his Jazz Surge received FOUR Grammy nominations for the band’s critically acclaimed “Whispers on the Wind” album: Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album, Best Instrumental Composition (“Warped Cowboy”), Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella (“All Hat, No Saddle”) and Best Improvised Jazz Solo, for violinist Sara Caswell.

Unfortunately, Owen lost to (good) artists with higher profiles and much greater name recognition (remember that part about “popularity contest”?)

Still, how many artists — of any genre? — received 4 Grammy noms this year? Owen achieved quite a feat.

 

Tampa Jazz Calendar: Dave Stryker, Peter Bernstein, Diana Krall, more

Celebrated singer-pianist Diana Krall, who probably qualifies as a jazz superstar, makes her fourth appearance at Ruth Eckerd Hall with a Jan. 30 performance supporting her recent Turn Up the Quiet album. And, yeah, file premium-seat tickets under “crazy prices” ($175 & $138.75). On the other hand, nice to see a jazz musician get pop-star pay.

No definitive word on which musicians are joining Krall for the Clearwater date, but for a December show in Ottawa, she was joined by guitarist Anthony Wilson, bassist Robert Hurst, violinist Stuart Duncan, and drummer Karriem Riggins. Check out Peter Hum’s review.

And here’s a video of her appearance on “Jimmy Kimmel Live!” in August.

Dave-Stryker-740x493

Two superb, nationally known guitarists, Dave Stryker (pictured, above) and Peter Bernstein, are headed our way, too, for shows sponsored or co-sponsored by the Tampa Jazz Club. Stryker and Bernstein frequently play all the major NYC jazz clubs and big jazz festivals you can name.

Ahead:

  • Sunday, Jan. 28 — Tampa Jazz Guitar Summit/Tampa Jazz Club: Dave Stryker Quintet (w saxophonist Jack Wilkins, pianist Chris Rottmayer, bassist Charlie Silva, and drummer Walt Hubbard). HCC Ybor Mainstage Theatre, Ybor City, 3 pm. Link
  • Monday, Jan. 29 — Tampa Jazz Guitar Summit/Monday Night Jazz: Peter Bernstein, with the USF Faculty Jazz Ensemble (guitarist LaRue Nickelson, pianist/keyboardist Chris Rottmayer, bassist Mark Neuenschwander, and drummer Ric Craig)USF Concert Hall, Tampa, 7:30 pm. Link 
  • Tuesday, Jan. 30 — Diana Krall, Ruth Eckerd Hall, Clearwater, 7:30 pm. Link
  • Wednesday, Feb. 14 — Whitney James‘ Jazz Valentine. Side Door at the Palladium, St. Petersburg, 8 pm. Link
  • Wednesday, Feb. 21 — St. Petersburg Jazz Festival: Tal Cohen (piano) Trio, with bassist Dion Kerr and drummer David Chiverton. Side Door at the Palladium, St. Petersburg, 7:30 pm. Link
  • Thursday, Feb. 22 — St. Petersburg Jazz Festival: (Saxophonist) Jeff Rupert Quintet with Veronica Swift (vocals), pianist Richard Drexler, bassist Ben Kramer, and drummer Marty Morell. Side Door at the Palladium, St. Petersburg, 7:30 pm. Link
  • Friday, Feb. 23 — St. Petersburg Jazz Festival: B3 Fury with the Shawn Brown Quintet, with guitarist Nate Najar, saxophonist Jeremy Carter, and drummer Anthony Breach. Side Door at the Palladium, St. Petersburg, 7:30 pm. Link
  • Saturday, Feb. 24 — St. Petersburg Jazz Festival: Helios Jazz Orchestra with (vocalists) Whitney James & Chuck Wansley. Side Door at the Palladium, St. Petersburg, 7:30 pm. Link
  • Sunday, Feb. 25 — St. Petersburg Jazz Festival: (Pianist) Gabriel Hernandez Trio, with bassist Mauricio Rodriguez and drummer Dimas Sanchez. Side Door at the Palladium, St. Petersburg, 7:30 pm. Link
  • Monday, Feb. 26 — Monday Night Jazz: (Pianist/keyboardist) John Beasley. USF Concert Hall, Tampa, 7:30 pm. Link
  • Friday, March 2 — Tony Bennett. Mahaffey Theater, St. Petersburg, 7:30 pm. Link
  • Sunday, March 11 — Tampa Jazz Club: (Singer) Fred Johnson & (bassist) Michael Ross. HCC Ybor Mainstage Theatre, Ybor City, 3 pm. Link
  • Monday, March 26 — USF Monday Night Jazz: (Pianist) Steve Allee. USF Concert Hall, 7:30 pm. Link
  • Sunday, April 8 — Tampa Jazz Club: (Saxophonist) Harry Allen. HCC Ybor Mainstage Theatre, 3 pm. Link

RIP, Hugh Masekela

Hugh Masekela was a rarity — A global jazz star who didn’t hail from the US.

Born in South Africa, the trumpeter and flugelhorn player studied in the UK & US, where he befriended Coltrane, Miles and Mingus, and gained international acclaim via 1968 hit song “Grazing in the Grass” and other recordings.

Later, Masekela came to attention among even more listeners thanks to his work with Paul Simon on the 1986 “Graceland” recording and tours, and on Simon’s “The Rhythm of the Saints” album, released in 1982.

Masekela, also an anti-apartheid activist, died Tuesday at age 78.

Check out these print, video, and audio pieces:

New York Times — https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/23/obituaries/hugh-masekela-dies.html

Billboard — https://www.billboard.com/articles/news/obituary/8095489/hugh-masekela-south-african-jazz-legend-dies-78

JazzTimes — https://jazztimes.com/news/trumpeter-hugh-masekela-78-dies/

DownBeat — http://downbeat.com/news/detail/masekela-succumbs-to-cancer-at-78

The Guardian — https://www.theguardian.com/music/2018/jan/23/hugh-masekela-south-african-jazz-trumpeter-dies-aged-78

CNN — https://www.cnn.com/2018/01/23/africa/hugh-masekela-dies-intl/index.html

NPR — https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2018/01/23/579885226/hugh-masekela-father-of-south-african-jazz-dies-at-78

 

 

Vincent Herring, Hard Times (CD review)

Vincent Herring“Is this disc’s title an apropos description of the current era, with its semi-permanent malaise, and anger seemingly just below the surface of all public discourse? Maybe,” I wrote, in my review for JazzTimes.Vincent Herring’s response: Gather like-minded musicians and make a joyful noise with a set of muscular blues-tinted jazz.”

Read the complete review here.

Fun fact: Back in 2000, I played the Nat Adderley memorial concert at Florida Southern College’s Branscomb Auditorium, in Lakeland, my hometown. Nat lived there for many decades after relocating from New Jersey; at FSC, he was artist-in-residence, and, with FSC music prof Larry Burke, he launched the (now-defunct) Child of the Sun Jazz Festival.

How’d I wind up playing that show, alongside former Adderley musical associates and friends, including drummer Jimmy Cobb, pianists Larry Willis and Rob Bargad, saxophonists Vincent Herring and Antonio Hart, and trumpeter Longineau Parsons, among others?

Here’s how it happened: Burke had asked me to lend my upright bass to Walter Booker for the performance, which I was happy to do. I’d previously let another NYC bassist, Santi Debriano, borrow my bass when he played one of the editions of the Child of the Sun fest. About three hours before the show was slated to start, Burke called me, told me that Bookie was ailing (an asthma attack) and unable to play, and asked if I’d fill in.

I couldn’t ever have actually properly filled in for Booker, who died in 2006, but I had a (slightly nervous) blast playing the gig — won’t ever forget that performance.

I’d had a chance to get to know Nat a little bit some years early, when I interviewed him for an extended feature in one of the first issues of Jazziz magazine; I was a part of that mag from the start, beginning with exploratory meetings at the condo of Michael Fagien, who was then a med student (or a resident?) at UF. I recall discussing what the mag should be named — I wasn’t in favor of “Jazziz.” What did  I know? 🙂

And that’s … almost the rest of the story 🙂

BTW — had a chance on Saturday to talk with Debriano after one of his sets at Smalls in NYC. He was leading a great quartet with Craig Handy on tenor, Bill O’Connell on piano, and Living Colour drummer Will Calhoun.

Debriano said he hopes to soon record with that group.

Most important jazz concert in history?

History’s most important jazz concert? It was Benny Goodman’s appearance Carnegie Hall on Jan. 16, 1938, according to Phil Schaap, curator of Jazz at Lincoln Center.

“The Goodman concert at Carnegie Hall is the cornerstone to jazz having performance space in the concert hall,” Schaap recently told NPR. “But most importantly, aesthetically, it establishes that jazz has value for listening purposes only.”

The concert also made history for breaking cultural barriers: Goodman’s band, with drummer Gene Krupa, included six black musicians — pianists Count Basie and Teddy Wilson, saxophonist Lester Young and vibraphonist Lionel Hampton — during a time when music venues didn’t allow that kind of racial mixing.

The recording of the show, finally released in 1950, was one of the first million-selling LPs.

Check out the full story (and audio) here.