Tampa Jazz Notes — Kenny Drew Jr. Memorial; O Som Do Jazz at HCC Ybor; Diana Krall at the Capitol

Aside from a piece in Jazz Times and some blog posts (including mine, below, and those in Jazz Truth, JazzWax, and via WUSF News), the late great pianist Kenny Drew‘s passing hasn’t attracted much attention in the music press or in mainstream newspapers. I didn’t see any notice of Kenny’s death in his hometown paper, the Tampa Bay Times, or in the New York Times, which often notes the deaths of major musicians. (Correct me if I’m wrong).

Kenny, who died on Aug. 3 at age 56, will be honored by friends, family, colleagues and fans during a memorial service Saturday Aug. 23 at McCabe United Methodist Church in St. Petersburg. The memorial will be held at 11 a.m. at the church, 2800 26th Ave. South.

“His genius will be missed,” as noted in an announcement sent by the Tampa Jazz Club, home to many concerts featuring Kenny, including a terrific trio performance in May.

That trio, with bassist Joe Porter and drummer John Jenkins, recently released a CD, titled “The Music of Tom Becker.” As of now, it’s available via download through CD Baby and Amazon.

A memorial fund for Kenny has been established through his church, Unity of Midtown, 511 Prescott St., South, St. Petersburg, FL 33712. Donations can be made by checks payable to “Unity of Midtown” or via PayPal. More info is here.

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O Som Do Jazz, the Brazilian/jazz band led by trombonist/composer David Manson, plays the Tampa Jazz Club’s first show of the fall season — Sunday, Sept. 28 at 3 pm at HCC Ybor’s Performing Arts Building. More details.

SPC prof Manson, singer Andrea Moraeas Manson, saxophonist Austin Vickrey, pianist David Cubillos, bassist Alejandro Arenas and drummer Mark Feinman will play music from the band’s two recordings. Two tunes from the group’s “A Kiss From Rio” recording were heard on the HBO series “Looking.”

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The good news: The jazz-rooted singer and underrated pianist Diana Krall is returning to the Tampa Bay area, with a show Dec. 14 at 7:30 pm at the the Capitol Theatre in downtown Clearwater (concert affiliated with Ruth Eckerd Hall). She’ll be joined by a first-rate band — guitarist Anthony Wilson, bassist Dennis Crouch, fiddler Stuart Duncan, drummer Karriem Riggins and keyboardist Patrick Warren.

The not-great news: It’ll cost you an arm and a leg to attend this show, as tickets START at $102.25. Seriously? Sure, it’s an “intimate” setting, but that’s about four times what you’d pay to see a show in the world’s greatest jazz club, The Village Vanguard in NYC. ‘Sup with that?

Details.

 

Listening Post #7: Madeline Eastman, Gov’t Mule, Wynton Marsalis, Avery Sharpe, Take 6

Five releases in rotation at home and in the car – a list without comment (in alphabetical order):

madelineMadeline Eastman, Can You Hear Me? (Mad Kat, 2008)

Gov’t Mule, Mighty High (ATO, 2007)

Wynton Marsalis, He and She (Blue Note, 2009)

sharpeAvery Sharpe, Autumn Moonlight (JKNM, 2009)

Take 6, The Standard (Heads Up, 2008)

Madeleine Peyroux’s New Single: A Cross Between Billie Holiday and Hall & Oates?

peyroux1Madeleine Peyroux has often — and somewhat accurately — been described as a singer who channels Billie Holiday.

Her way laidback style of singing is sometimes quite expressive, albeit on other occasions her voice is paired with music that is deadly lethargic.

Marc Silver, in a piece on NPR, says that “You Can’t Do Me,” a single from Peyroux’s forthcoming CD, makes him feel “as if  Holiday and the self-proclaimed ‘rock and soul’ boys (Hall & Oates) had a musical moment.”

To my ears, the tune sounds more like Steely Dan, not Hall & Oates, is in the mix. That makes sense, given that Walter Becker co-wrote the song.

Madeleine Peyroux, \”You Can\’t Do Me\”

Read Silver’s review here.

The song was co-written by Peyroux, Becker, and album producer Larry Klein (Joni Mitchell, Herbie Hancock, Holly Cole). The CD, Bare Bones is due for release March 10.

Silver’s review:

“Madeleine Peyroux Finds Rock And Soul

In the secret labs of music collaboration, where deceased singers are
matched with living partners, has anyone ever tried to bring Billie
Holiday and Hall & Oates together? Probably not, but when Lady Day
enthusiast Madeleine Peyroux sings “You Can’t Do Me,” it’s as if
Holiday and the self-proclaimed “rock and soul” boys had a musical
moment.

The song, from Peyroux’s new album Bare Bones, starts with an insistent
piano chord — very “Rich Girl.” In her silkily melancholy voice,
Peyroux tells her lover he can’t “do” her the way he did before,
because when he does, it makes her feel “bust like an Internet
millionaire / boom like a Lebanese belly dancer / bang like a new
year’s firecracker.”

The droll list goes on, colored with a jaunty wah-wah guitar, organ
trills and Peyroux’s own delicate touches, such as the way she colors
the word “blue” with aural shades of indigo. But instead of sounding
like a vintage jazz singer, the way she usually does, Peyroux traffics
more in rock and soul. Hall & Oates would be proud.”